risings of 1536

How far do the sources suggest that the risings of 1536 were motivated by religious grievances
Collectively as sources all three of the sources suggest that the risings of 1536 were motivated by religious grievances. However sources one and two also suggest that the risings were due to other significant factors, one of the main factors being taxes.
Source one suggests that the risings of 1536 were heavily motivated by religious grievances. Source one says that “the service of god is not well performed” as a result of this, religious members became increasingly frustrated as they believed that because of the many reformations being made to their religion, what was once performed to what they believed to be a high standard, was then deemed “not well performed” which angered many religious members which consequently led to them demanding change. Source one also says that the bishops that the king had promoted “subverted the faith of Christ” showing that the new reformations were causing the newly instated bishops to undermine their religion showing that they were in fact corrupt and suggesting that the risings of 1536 were significantly motivated by the religious grievances due to the bishops in which the king promoted.
Source one also suggests that the risings of 1536 were also significantly motivated by other significant factors such as taxes and corrupt advisors to the king. Source one says that “the tax payable next year will be demanding” as a result of this, again the religious members would have become increasingly frustrated with the reformations being made and wanted voice their opinions to the king with their demands in the pilgrimage of grace, suggesting that the 1536 risings were heavily motivated by other significant factors. Also consequently the king would be put under a significant amount of pressure because of the fact that he had a large amount if opposition demanding…

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